Home » Spectrum » Goodbye To Examinations Failure
Secret Behind Examination Success

Goodbye To Examinations Failure

Title: Secret Behind Examination Success
Author: Tunde Ogunsola
Publisher: Education Times Publication
Pages: 304
Year: 2015
Reviewer: Adjekpagbon Blessed Mudiaga

Tunde Ogunsola’s new book, Secret Behind Examination Success, is a commendable effort by the author in a situation where students no longer want to read but make good grades in both internal and external school examinations over the years, with the connivance of some shameless teachers and unprincipled parents on one hand and the students personal laziness on the other.
Divided into twelve chapters with topical headings such as- The Concept of Examination Success; Understanding and Application of Examination Techniques; Concentration and Curbing Distractions; Overcoming Comprehension Difficulties and Sustaining Growth in Reading; How To Become a Fast Reader; Your Path To Academic Excellence, amongst others, the book brings to the fore how over the years, Nigeria has recorded poor performance in public examinations, and its new level of ebbing into the abyss of educational demise due to monumental failure by students in recent times.
Ogunsola however, points out that despite the huge deficits in the education sector; some sterling individuals are making outstanding progress in their examinations. He says “Every year, such students prove their academic prowess by their uncommon performances.”
The book highlight the legal things and techniques that honest students are doing well, strengthening them to excel, which others that are struggling to succeed could apply to achieve their academic goals too.
Commenting on the standards of secondary school education as yardstick for admission into higher institutions of learning in Nigeria, Ogunsola posits that “It is an established fact that students’ performance in public examination especially the Senior Secondary Examination (SSCE), is one of the criteria for measuring and establishing the effectiveness or otherwise of Nigerian secondary schools and the prerequisite for gaining admission into tertiary institutions.”
It is on this basis that many lazy students do all sorts of illicit and condemnable things to get the necessary grades in English and Mathematics including three other relevant subjects in order to be eligible for admission into Nigerian Ivory Towers. Unfortunately, some also buy their way through by giving money to admission officers and lecturers who allow them to be enrolled as students even when some could barely write two sentences without committing terrible blunders.
Hence, apart from the earlier aforementioned topical headings, the author pinpoints the mastery of common examination terms, how to answer mathematical and scientific questions, how to develop positive attitude towards studying and examinations, the secret of how to successfully understand oneself, techniques of effective study, and computers as personal educational tools, as remedies to perennial failure by conventional students and mature people who write professional exams from time to time.
Remedies to examination failures are replete in the book like a doctor’s prescription for medical ailments. Both intellectual and academic analgesics, injections, vitamins and what have you that neutralize laziness and fear to study to achieve academic goals without engaging in nefarious means to excel, are well dissected and explained with electrifying analysis and simplistic use of elegant diction for the basic understanding of any average reasonable reader.
The author’s effort is commendable as he tends to always use his intellectual works to encourage and develop the moral, academic and social lifestyle of the average Nigeria youth or student.
Apart from being the Editor-in-Chief and publisher of The Nigerian Education Times magazine, the author is also a traditional title holder, the Balogun Apesin of Ode-Omuland, who had published a book titled Letter To The Nigerian Youth, in the recent past, to foster discipline and positive character of Nigerian youths.
He studied Guidance and Counselling at the University of Ibadan, and also holds a Masters degree in the same discipline and Mass Communication from the University of Lagos as well.
Nonetheless, he is a member of the Counselling Association of Nigeria (CASON), Nigerian Union of Journalists (NUJ), and he is the current President of Association of Education Journalists (AEJ). He is married and lives in Lagos with his family.

%d bloggers like this: